American Folk Art Museum 3

This grouping highlights works made in the 1960s and 1970s by Louisiana-based artist Clementine Hunter from the American Folk Art Museum’s collection.

Collection Loan Partnership Available Spring 2023 – Spring 2026

Exhibition Images

  • Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Saturday Night, 1968, acrylic on board, 24 x 16 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mary Bass Newlin, 1989.9.1. Photo by John Parnell.

    Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Saturday Night, 1968, acrylic on board, 24 x 16 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mary Bass Newlin, 1989.9.1. Photo by John Parnell.

  • Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Black Christ on Cross, c. 1972, oil on cardboard, 27 1/4 x 12 1/4 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mrs. Chauncey Newlin, 1991.23.1, Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

    Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Black Christ on Cross, c. 1972, oil on cardboard, 27 1/4 x 12 1/4 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mrs. Chauncey Newlin, 1991.23.1, Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

  • Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Black Matriarch, c. 1970s, oil on cardboard, 24 x 16 1/2 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mrs. Chauncey Newlin, 1991.23.4. Photo by John Parnell.

    Clementine Hunter (1886/87-1988), Black Matriarch, c. 1970s, oil on cardboard, 24 x 16 1/2 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Mrs. Chauncey Newlin, 1991.23.4. Photo by John Parnell.

About the Artworks

This selection of works by Clementine Hunter explores her lived experiences while living and working on Melrose Plantation, located in the Cane River region of Louisiana. Born around 1887, Hunter and her family worked as agricultural laborers and later in life, she supported her own children as their sole financial provider. After busy days as a housekeeper and cook at the plantation, she spent nights teaching herself how to paint. Characterized by their vibrant colors and populated depictions of her community, her paintings were not exhibited until 1949 and were recognized by institutions such as American Folk Art Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in the 1970s. Hunter remained in Louisiana for the rest of her artistic career until her death in 1988, producing a prolific range of works that were deeply connected to the world around her.

View the checklist

Specifications

  • Organizer

    American Folk Art Museum | AFAM

  • Loan Duration

    2 years

  • Space Requirements

    N/A

  • Facility Requirements

    Temp: 65-75°F
    RH: 40-60%
    Security: 24 hr. CCTV and roaming guards

  • Support

    Art Bridges covers all costs to prepare and ship the artworks to the borrowing museums. The foundation encourages borrowing museums to apply for accompanying Learning & Engagement funding to support the activation and interpretation of Collection Loan Partnership artworks. Learning & Engagement funding supports multidisciplinary programming, interpretive materials, and community outreach.

Availability & Touring

Want To See More?

See all of the groupings in the Collection Loan Partnership.